Interviews

  • CAMP Takes VOLTA

    A group interview with Idris Habib, Evelyn Politzer, Silvana Soriano, and Franck de las Mercedes.
    by Maria Di Giammarco
    CAMP Takes VOLTA

    The CAMP’s participation in VOLTA is particularly meaningful considering the way the fair’s ethos aligns with ours—an intentional and accessible relationship with art. Keep reading for a deep dive into Booth 215 with artists Idris Habib, Evelyn Politzer, Silvana Soriano, and Franck de las Mercedes.

  • Who is Joseph Ginsberg to Joseph Ginsberg? An Interview

    "The work is the energy. I am solely the tool to make it happen."
    Who is Joseph Ginsberg to Joseph Ginsberg? An Interview

    CAMPER Amy Clarke, was fortunate enough to sit down and talk with a man who embodies the truth of what it is to be a creative—native New Yorker, artist, and designer Joseph Ginsberg. Gifted with what seems to be an innate artistic vision, the artist has been dreaming and drawing since he was a child. Fast forward to the present day, and the artist has gathered over 40 years of professional experience the industry from painting or blowing glass in his studio, to designing hotel lobbies from top to bottom. With such a variety of outlets, Amy wanted to talk with Ginsberg himself to find out how which speaks more to him. Who is Joseph Ginsberg to Joseph Ginsberg? 

     

  • Como la cigarra: An Interview with Clara Fialho

    Fialho discusses Jungian constructs, the power of cicadas, and how not having a babysitter was life-changing.
    by Maria Di Giammarco
    Clara Fialho in her studio" Clara Fialho ©
    Clara Fialho in her studio" Clara Fialho ©

    "I like it when people come up to me and tell me that that my work has brought them joy, or that it’s given them goosebumps. It means I must be doing something right, but then again, it is beyond my control. I can only hope that they will take something away from it."

  • Moving Parts: An Interview with Laetitia Adam-Rabel

    "While I do pray to God, I am a little burnt on what male leadership has brought us to. So I feel it’s time to revere the female and the male alike."
    by Maria Di Giammarco
    Laetitia Adam-Rabel. Courtesy of the artist.
    Laetitia Adam-Rabel. Courtesy of the artist.
  • In Conversation with the Women Pulling at the Threads of Social Discourse

    Laetitia Adam-Rabel, Viviana Romero, Sandra Onetti, Maria Lino, Leslie McKinley, Laura Marsh, and Nancy Billings reflect on fiber artistry and their purpose as creatives.
    by Maria Di Giammarco
    In Conversation with the Women Pulling at the Threads of Social Discourse

    As we continue our third-annual collaboration with Fiber Artists Miami Association, the exhibition, Women Pulling at the Threads of Social Discourse, continues to reveal just how layered the original premise is at its core. If there's anything we've learned over the years, it's that fiber's adaptable quality extends beyond its material capabilites. The idea that textile art holds a dual nature in its capacity to be equally tender and jarring brings about necessary, albeit poignant, questions of its role within the context of "fine" art, as well as just how much validity our societies are willing to afford to the feminine experience. 

     

    This year's edition, which features 100 pieces displayed as massive quilt, can be explored from perspectives totaling to the same, whether they're present subconsciously or explicitly. What is certain and unquestionable is that the democratization of the fine art industry allows us, the audience, to interrogate ourselves better, and more deeply, than a run-of-the mill homogeneity allows. Whether one feels uncomfortable, affrimed, or like they've learned something they weren't expecting to, what unites both the artists and the audience is the idea that self-expression isn't something personal, and instead something that is more often than not done in the same of unity.

     

    In typical CAMP fashion, we're interested in what the artists have to say—about their relationship with textiles, whether fiber art and fine art are as mutually exclusive as we've been lead to believe, and about their nature as artists. Read on to get to know Laetitia Adam-Rabel, Natalia SchonowskiViviana Romero, Sandra Onetti, Maria Lino, Leslie McKinley, Laura Marsh, and Nancy Billings.